BRILLIANT AND BEAUTIFUL BLOG

What is the Origin of Religion?

imagesHow, or why, did religion originate? More to the point, did religion begin with God or man? It has become commonplace since the Enlightenment to understand the origin and development of religion in naturalistic terms: Religion is man-made. It is a crutch for the weak-minded. It is a feeling of absolute dependence. It is a projection of our father figure. It is the Mysterium Tremendum. It is rooted in universal archetypes of the human subconscious.

What does -God Loves You- mean?

UnknownWe long to be loved and to love. Yet we love imperfectly, and often disorderedly. But there is one who loves perfectly–God–and widely. In fact, God loves the whole world, Jesus says in the oft-quoted John 3:16. But what does it mean? How does God love man?

Given the great gulf between the Creator and creature, we can only apprehend, according to C. S. Lewis, God’s love of man through various analogies. From the various types of love known among creatures, we can formulate a partial picture of God’s love for us.

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind and the God Who Made It

 

imagesI just finished reading William Kamkwamba’s inspiring book The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind. In the autobiography (co-written with Bryan Mealer), Kamkwamba shares his childhood story of growing up in the impoverished country of Malawi, a country where magic rules and modern science is often viewed with suspicion and mystery.

The (Spiritual) Danger of Too Much Technology

imagesIn our increasingly technologically driven world, it is easy to settle for the image of something instead of the thing itself. Instead of meeting face-to-face with friends, we interact over Facebook.[1] Instead of going hunting, or fishing, or dancing, or playing baseball or basketball or ping pong, we stand in front of a TV with a remote control and live a virtual life, mediated through high-definition (“real life”) monitors.

Playing God, Power, and the Gospel

Playing GodIn a good book, there will there be one real gem—a new idea, insight, or way of looking at the world—that is both illuminating and profound. In Andy Crouch’s latest, Playing God: Redeeming the Gift of Power, there is a treasure of new insights related to the notions of power, idolatry, and the gospel story that make this a great book.

Anti-intellectualism: The Trojan Horse Within the Church

trojan horseWe are in trouble. We no longer possess, as a culture, the ability to think well about the things that matter most. When it comes to thinking about the nature or existence of God, the purpose of life, or the morality of war, homosexuality, or abortion, we are guided more by our feelings than reason. When we want to find knowledge, largely, as a culture we look to scientists and not philosophers or theologians. As a result, our culture is fixated on image, celebrities, experience, slogans, and thirty-second sound bites. We no longer possess the ability to think well about things that matter most. And the church is no different than the broader culture it finds itself within.

Death By Living

death by livingLife is a story. You are mortal. There was a time when you were not. There will be a time when you exit the stage of this life. The past is the fruit of providence and thousands of personal narratives that led to you. You did not choose where to set your feet. You did not choose when to enter the stage. You choose where to set them next. You choose what to do now that you are on stage. You walk across the wet concrete of time and shape the world with your life. And then you die. Spent. Spend it well.

Why I believe in the Resurrection of Jesus

JesusAs an undergraduate student at Miami University, some well-meaning students confronted me with the truth claims of Christianity. They explained the gospel to me. They explained that Jesus was divine and that I was a sinner. They explained to me that I could find forgiveness for sins if I tusted in Jesus. They finally left.

The Church Needs Philosophers and Philosophers Need the Church

socratesHistorically, philosophy was understood as the hand-maided of the queen of the sciences–theology. Today, philosophy is often looked at with suspicion or (perhaps worse) an uninterested glance by those within the church. I offer the following essay, hosted by the Gospel Coalition website on why The Church Needs Philosophers and Philosophers Need the Church.

Walker Percy, Ontological Lapsometers, and the End of the World

Unknown-1Modern man is fragmented and hollow at its core. In modern man’s wake there is often destruction and ruin. Walker Percy’s Love in the Ruins is an hilarious romp through the ruins of modern man’s cathedral, set in a place called Paradise, Louisiana as the world seemingly comes to an end. Dr. Thomas More, a backslidden catholic and womanizer, has created an ontological lapsometer that diagnoses and treats human disorders that threaten to disintegrate society. Unfortunately, if the Lapsometer get’s into the wrong hands, it can also lead to chaos and the breakdown of society. In Percy’s story we read of Dr. More’s womanizing exploits as he prepares for the end of the world and tries to keep his invention from falling into the wrong hands.