BRILLIANT AND BEAUTIFUL BLOG

Mars Hill, Bridge Building, and the Gospel in a Pluralistic World

imagesI recently read Paul Copan and Kenneth Litwak’s The Gospel in the Marketplace of Ideas. The book is a detailed look at the Apostle Paul’s famous speech to the skeptical Greeks on Mars Hill. What we find is an expertly crafted speech that effectively builds a bridge between a pluralistic culture and the gospel.

Homer, the Odyssey and the Gospel, Part 4 – Unbelief and Doubt

Unknown-1In this final post on Homer’s Odyssey and the gospel, we’ll explore the nature of faith and unbelief. (see part one here, part two here, and part three here).

Homer, the Odyssey and the Gospel, Part 3 – Beggars at the Palace

images-1In this third posts (see part one here and part two here) on Homer and the Gospel, we’ll explore the nature of tragedy and the hope that Jesus brings to a world gone wrong. 

Homer, the Odyssey, and the Gospel, Part 2 – Our longing for Home

UnknownIn my last post, I explored how Homer’s Odyssey prompts us to live for a cause greater than ourselves. In this post, I’ll explore how the story points us to our true home.

Homer, the Odyssey, and the Gospel, Part 1- Our Quest for More

imagesPeanut butter and jelly . . . chips and dip . . . Homer and the gospel. Wait, Homer and the gospel? How do they go together, you ask? Good question! Homer is to the gospel as longings are to their proper object. Homer prompts, prods, and points to the gospel as man’s greatest need and highest good in at least four ways.

Is Christianity or Islam the Greatest Religion?

UnknownGiven the amount of evil perpetrated by followers of Islam worldwide, I was quite surprised to read in Stephen Prothero’s introduction to his book God is not One that he thinks Islam, and not Christianity, is the greatest religion in the world. In this post, I’ll explain his reasoning and then share why I think he is wrong.

Five Things I’ve learned from C. S. Lewis

UnknownI’ve recently finished reading George Sayer’s wonderful biography on C. S. Lewis entitled Jack. I’ve always been drawn to Lewis’ writings. His fictional stories awaken my reason and imagination, urging me “further up and further in” to the mysteries and wonder of God and this God-bathed world. His nonfiction helps me see more clearly the beauty of Christ and the folly of materialism, idolatry, and false loves.

How Reading Enlarges Us: Or My Favorite Books of 2014

imagesI admit it. I love reading books. Not those enlightened by pixels or advanced with the swipe of a finger, but old fashion paperbacks. I love the feel of flipping a completed page, underlining favorite passages, and writing notes in the margins. This year was a banner year in terms of books read and diversity of topics explored, helped along by new course preparation at the seminary where I teach (courses from ancient philosophy to world religions to the Christian virtues made for a diverse reading list).

Urban Apologetics

UnknownTypically, books on apologetics are either broadly topically driven (e.g., works on historical apologetics, scientific apologetics, philosophical apologetics, etc.) or narrowly topically driven (e.g., books refuting Mormonism, responding to Islam, answering the new atheists, etc.). What is unique about Christopher Brooks’ new book on apologetics is that it is rooted in place—urban cities—and the specific challenges to the Christian faith found therein. In writing Urban Apologetics, Brooks is attempting to fill a void he perceives in the apologetic literature, for “what is . . . desperately lacking are books that equip urban Christians to take the teaching of Christ and apply them to the most important and defining issues facing our communities and society.”  

C. S. Lewis, The Great Divorce, and Solid People

UnknownThis past weekend, my wife and I went to the theatrical performance of C. S. Lewis’s The Great Divorce in Dallas. It was wonderful, and if the play is coming to your city, I highly recommend you see it. As my wife described it, seeing the book acted out on stage helps one to feel what Lewis was communicating with words. In this post I want to highlight some of my favorite Lewisian insights from the book (and play).