What Best Explains the Mind to World Fit?

imagesA deep fact about the nature of our universe is the remarkable conformity of our human minds to its patterning. According to John Polkinghorne, “we live in a world whose physical fabric is endowed with transparent rational beauty.”[1] From the large-scale structure of our universe described by cosmology to the small-scale processes described by quantum theory, our universe is characterized by a wonderful order that is expressible in concise and elegant mathematical terms. The Laws of Nature are breathtakingly simple—and suggestive—it is as if the universe is haunted by a Mind behind it all.

C.S. Lewis, Religion, Rocketry, and Other Worlds

UnknownIn his essay “Religion and Rocketry”—originally published in 1958 as “Will we Lose God in Outer Space?”—C.S. Lewis raises the question of alien life in a world created by God. What if life was discovered on other planets? What would such a discovering mean for Christianity? Would such a discovery be the basis for a new attack on Christianity? Or seized by the faithful as the basis for a new defense?

The Return of the Logical Positivist

UnknownLogical positivism was a philosophical movement that flourished in the 1920s and 1930s in Europe and the 1940s and 1950s in America. At its core, the movement represented a commitment to empirical science and its technical apparatus (mathematics and logic), a new way of doing philosophy, a radical anti-metaphysical stance, and the rejection of synthetic a priori statements. The movement was largely abandoned in the 1960s and 1970s. Even so, its spirit survives.

On the Integration of Faith and Scholarship

UnknownChristian scholars, we are told, belong to two distinct communities: the community of scholars and the community of faith. An immediate question that arises is how ought a Christian scholar relate these two communities? Possible answers include: separate, overlap, and integrate.

Happiness is Edenistic, not Hedonistic

UnknownThe world thinks of happiness hedonistically, God thinks of happiness edenistically. This is one of the central ideas of David Naugle’s highly recommended book Reordered Loves, Reordered LivesLearning the Deep Meaning of Happiness. In a previous post, I discussed the contemporary view of happiness as pleasure. In light of our fatigue and failure to find happiness via pleasure, perhaps its time to consider God’s perspective on happiness and to consider the happiness that He offers.