What is the Origin of Religion?

imagesHow, or why, did religion originate? More to the point, did religion begin with God or man? It has become commonplace since the Enlightenment to understand the origin and development of religion in naturalistic terms: Religion is man-made. It is a crutch for the weak-minded. It is a feeling of absolute dependence. It is a projection of our father figure. It is the Mysterium Tremendum. It is rooted in universal archetypes of the human subconscious.

What does -God Loves You- mean?

UnknownWe long to be loved and to love. Yet we love imperfectly, and often disorderedly. But there is one who loves perfectly–God–and widely. In fact, God loves the whole world, Jesus says in the oft-quoted John 3:16. But what does it mean? How does God love man?

Given the great gulf between the Creator and creature, we can only apprehend, according to C. S. Lewis, God’s love of man through various analogies. From the various types of love known among creatures, we can formulate a partial picture of God’s love for us.

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind and the God Who Made It

 

imagesI just finished reading William Kamkwamba’s inspiring book The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind. In the autobiography (co-written with Bryan Mealer), Kamkwamba shares his childhood story of growing up in the impoverished country of Malawi, a country where magic rules and modern science is often viewed with suspicion and mystery.

The (Spiritual) Danger of Too Much Technology

imagesIn our increasingly technologically driven world, it is easy to settle for the image of something instead of the thing itself. Instead of meeting face-to-face with friends, we interact over Facebook.[1] Instead of going hunting, or fishing, or dancing, or playing baseball or basketball or ping pong, we stand in front of a TV with a remote control and live a virtual life, mediated through high-definition (“real life”) monitors.

Playing God, Power, and the Gospel

Playing GodIn a good book, there will there be one real gem—a new idea, insight, or way of looking at the world—that is both illuminating and profound. In Andy Crouch’s latest, Playing God: Redeeming the Gift of Power, there is a treasure of new insights related to the notions of power, idolatry, and the gospel story that make this a great book.